This is a convenience function to calculate some statistical tests on the residuals models. Currently, the following statistics are calculated: the shapiro.test to check the normality of the residuals, the box-pierce and ljung-box tests and the durbin watson test to check the autocorrelation of the residuals. In all cases the p-values are returned.

modeltime_residuals_test(object, new_data = NULL, lag = 1, fitdf = 0, ...)

Arguments

object

A tibble extracted from modeltime::modeltime_residuals().

new_data

A tibble to predict and calculate residuals on. If provided, overrides any calibration data.

lag

The statistic will be based on lag autocorrelation coefficients. Default: 1 (Applies to Box-Pierce, Ljung-Box, and Durbin-Watson Tests)

fitdf

Number of degrees of freedom to be subtracted. Default: 0 (Applies Box-Pierce and Ljung-Box Tests)

...

Not currently used

Value

A tibble with with the p-values of the calculated statistical tests.

Details

Shapiro-Wilk Test

The Shapiro-Wilk tests the Normality of the residuals. The Null Hypothesis is that the residuals are normally distributed. A low P-Value below a given significance level indicates the values are NOT Normally Distributed.

If the p-value > 0.05 (good), this implies that the distribution of the data are not significantly different from normal distribution. In other words, we can assume the normality.

Box-Pierce and Ljung-Box Tests Tests

The Ljung-Box and Box-Pierce tests are methods that test for the absense of autocorrelation in residuals. A low p-value below a given significance level indicates the values are autocorrelated.

If the p-value > 0.05 (good), this implies that the residuals of the data are are independent. In other words, we can assume the residuals are not autocorrelated.

For more information about the parameters associated with the Box Pierce and Ljung Box tests check ?Box.Test

Durbin-Watson Test

The Durbin-Watson test is a method that tests for the absense of autocorrelation in residuals. The Durbin Watson test reports a test statistic, with a value from 0 to 4, where:

  • 2 is no autocorrelation (good)

  • From 0 to <2 is positive autocorrelation (common in time series data)

  • From >2 to 4 is negative autocorrelation (less common in time series data)

See also

Examples

library(tidyverse) library(lubridate) library(timetk) library(parsnip) library(rsample) # Data m750 <- m4_monthly %>% filter(id == "M750") # Split Data 80/20 splits <- initial_time_split(m750, prop = 0.9) # --- MODELS --- # Model 1: prophet ---- model_fit_prophet <- prophet_reg() %>% set_engine(engine = "prophet") %>% fit(value ~ date, data = training(splits))
#> Disabling weekly seasonality. Run prophet with weekly.seasonality=TRUE to override this.
#> Disabling daily seasonality. Run prophet with daily.seasonality=TRUE to override this.
# ---- MODELTIME TABLE ---- models_tbl <- modeltime_table( model_fit_prophet ) # ---- RESIDUALS ---- # In-Sample models_tbl %>% modeltime_calibrate(new_data = training(splits)) %>% modeltime_residuals() %>% modeltime_residuals_test()
#> # A tibble: 1 × 6 #> .model_id .model_desc shapiro_wilk box_pierce ljung_box durbin_watson #> <int> <chr> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> #> 1 1 PROPHET 0.0000450 0 0 0.924
# Out-of-Sample models_tbl %>% modeltime_calibrate(new_data = testing(splits)) %>% modeltime_residuals() %>% modeltime_residuals_test()
#> # A tibble: 1 × 6 #> .model_id .model_desc shapiro_wilk box_pierce ljung_box durbin_watson #> <int> <chr> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> #> 1 1 PROPHET 0.00169 0.197 0.176 1.37